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Adobe

Adobe Theatre at The Photography Show 2016

March 12, 2016

The Photography Show 2016 is just a week away and I’m super excited! Getting to spend time talking about Photoshop for four days! Plus, and equally important of course, I get to hang out with friend and fellow Nut Gavin Hoey while catching up with friends Rich Curtis and Dave Mallows (I’ve not seen Dave since last Photography Show!) [More]

Advanced Compositing With The PixelSquid 3D Photoshop Extension

December 3, 2015

In this tutorial we'll look at the advanced features of the plugin, where we can import a high-resolution layered Photoshop PSD file that replaces the low-resolution preview. As well as being highly detailed, the PSD version gives us the ability to blend the 3D object into the scene using specially created layers that allow us to easily control the colour and tone as well as being able to quickly select and adjust the different components of the object. [More]

Adding Adobe Stock Images to Your Libraries

November 6, 2015

A little while ago Adobe acquired the stock image service Fotolia and integration with the Creative Cloud was inevitable, but just how easy is it to get images from Adobe Stock to Photoshop? [More]

Beauty in Decay – Repairing a Photo with Photoshop

August 29, 2015

It’s a funny thing about me; if I see a damaged picture, sometimes I just really, really want to fix it. It’s almost like my fingers start tingling for the Wacom pen so I can get started. It doesn’t happen every, single time, but when it does good things usually happen. So, I decided to take a little time and fix one of them… About 6 (working) hours later, I was done with the first one I picked. It wasn’t one of the worst, but it sort of spoke to me. [More]

Photoshop Blur Gallery and Selections

July 21, 2015

While recently writing an upcoming post for Fotolia about the Photoshop Blur Gallery and Iris Blur I made a selection and found the difference between selection, non selection and Smart Objects is [More]

How to Add a Split Tone Effect in Photoshop CC

April 1, 2015

n this video tutorial, I'll show you how to apply simple and effective split tone effects to your images, using the built-in Photography Toning gradient maps in Adobe Photoshop. I'll also look at how you can customise the effects using the Gradient Editor and Opacity sliders. [More]

OnOne Perfect Photo Suite 8 – The Verdict

December 12, 2013

First up, this application works as a standalone or with Lightroom, Photoshop, Photoshop Elements or Aperture and there are three purchasing options, the Premium Edition works with all of the above and as a standalone, the Lightroom and Aperture version works with those two applications, Elements and as a standalone and the Standard version is a standalone only. Currently prices for the Premium edition are discounted to $179.95 (approx. £110 on 9/12/13) for new users and $99.95 (approx. £61 on 9/12/13) for an upgrade. There is a free 30 day trial available too from http://www.ononesoftware.com/products/suite8/ [More]

Oil Paint Filter Workflow for More Natural Looking Images

November 11, 2013

Over the past couple of months I've been exploring the Oil Paint filter in Photoshop. One of the things I wasn't happy about was the swirly, un-natural effect it was encouraging. So, I've come up with a workflow to help create more natural looking images, with a more natural paint feel to them. This technique is very easy and as you can see, even with explanation this one only takes 12 minutes to achieve. [More]

Replacing a view through a window with clipping masks in Photoshop Elements

September 13, 2013

In this month's Photoshop Elements tutorial I'm going to demonstrate a neat trick for changing the view through a window. There are many ways to approach this, of course, this is a particularly versatile method, however. Instead of cutting out the glass areas of the window and putting the new view beneath, we'll use the window panes as a clipping mask. If you're unfamiliar with the concept of clipping masks, it's a way of hiding parts of a layer based on the visible areas of the layer below. In this case, only the parts of the new view will be visible where they overlap the window panes, giving the impression that we're seeing the scene behind the window frame. This is often preferable to the usual masking technique, particularly if we want to use multiple images to build the composite, where the layers would need to be beneath the target layer as we can control the visibility without the need to move the layers around in the stack. If we want to see the whole image, we simply unclip it. [More]
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