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Articles by Janine Smith

About Janine Smith (110 Articles)
Janine Smith is the owner of Landailyn Research and Restoration, a Fort Worth, Texas based company whose services include family history research and photo restoration. Janine honed her skills in restoring badly damaged photos as a volunteer with Operation Photo Rescue, a non-profit organization whose mission is to repair photographs damaged by unforeseen circumstances such as house fires and natural disasters. <br> Janine’s work is well-known in the world of genealogical and historical societies, museums, libraries, university archives, and non-profit organizations; appearing on the board of directors for several organizations and institutions. She is a sought-after lecturer on photo restoration and preservation to libraries, genealogical and historical societies. <br> In addition to being a Lynda.com author, Janine is the author of many articles on research and restoration appearing in newspapers and magazines, both on and offline. Janine's history and photo restoration columns appear regularly on TipSquirrel.com and in the popular Shades Of The Departed Digital Magazine. <br> Janine is the winner of the 2010 “Photoshop User Award” in the photo-restoration category.

Healing Acne With Photoshop

Unfortunately, acne’s a normal part of adolescence (and, more often than not, adulthood), one that can be quite embarrassing for the person sporting it. Sometimes, it’s just as painful looking back at photographs and seeing the cursed red spots. My son, Jason, had terrible acne when he was in junior high, until he went to a dermatologist to take care of it. To this day, he’s still embarrassed to see those old pictures. So, even amongst all the discussion out there over whether using Photoshop to manipulate a photograph is good or bad, or ethical or not, maybe it’s not such a bad thing to do a little Photoshop magic on a senior photograph, or clean up a social media profile shot. Regardless of your personal opinion on that matter, I’m going to show you one way to erase a little acne in someone’s life. By the way, the photo I’ll be using for this tutorial is not my son, it’s a stock photo provided by Fotolia. [More]

5 Ways: Photoshop Color Correction

I’ve been doing this Photoshop / restoration / retouching thing a long time now and I can pretty well tell just by looking what type of color correction will work on what type of fading or color cast. Curves work really well on a certain kind of orangey-red cast that’s indicative of 1970’s chain store images while nothing short of a black and white adjustment and a hand tint will work on a particular sun faded yellow cast. I do, however, try more than one method on each image just to be certain I’m getting the best result. For my 5 Ways I’m going to list the five methods that pop in my head first. They won’t always be the most popular and some might be downright odd, but there are so many ways to do any one thing in Photoshop and, frankly, the best way to do anything is the way that gives you the best result. Always using Curves, for instance, is severely limiting your potential outcome. We’ll start the 5 Ways of Color Correction with the most obvious method: [More]

Quick Tip: Reduce Digital Noise with Photoshop

Have you ever had an image that has bits of color in it that clearly shouldn’t be there? I suppose there are all sorts of reasons they may be there (High ISO, low light…), but all some people care about is that they’re there and they want them to go away! When you see a big splotch of red on a blue shirt, it seems the simple thing to do is to do a Hue / Saturation adjustment, use the dropper to select the red and change the hue and saturation until you have a better match, but the truth is if you do that, the selection won’t be red, it’ll be the same color as the color the splotch is on, or blue. So no go on that. Besides, getting the colors to match, even somewhat, would be a pain, especially if you had a lot of photos taken at the same time, in the same conditions. So, the bad news is you can’t make them just easily go away. You can reduce them, though, and do it pretty fast, too. [More]

Tonal Recovery in ACR

Can photo restoration be done in Adobe Camera Raw (ACR)? Of course, you know it is. After all, you’ve seen it before, right? Up to a point, that is. You’re not going to be able to remove specks, spots, cracks and tears in ACR, so to be more precise, what you can do is add clarity. That’s it in a nutshell; restoration in ACR is all about clarity. So I suppose you could say that, no, photo restoration cannot be done in ACR, but tonal recovery most certainly can! [More]

Carbonite Cloud Back Up Review and Giveaway!

The good folks at Carbonite not only let me try it out, but they want one of our readers to have some peace of mind, too, so we’re giving away one year of the Home plan, a $59.99 value to one of you! It can also be used as a free year for anyone that already uses Carbonite. All you have to lose is a little upload time, and since you’re still able to do everything you normally do, that’s no biggie! [More]

Moving Backgrounds to Fix Backgrounds in Photoshop

What you see, below, is an aberration, a crime committed against a helpless photograph. Yes, a real photograph was harmed in the making of this mess. Why it was done is beside the point; it was done many years ago and now this image remains as one of the few a daughter has of her mother. This may not be a situation that comes up for the majority of you, but in case it, or something like it comes up, there’s a fairly easy way to get the white out…out. [More]

Image Restoration With Photoshop – Getting Rid Of Red Spots

Just like us, photographs get age spots. That’s what those rusty spots are, places where the emulsion is breaking down due to age. Typically the ways they’re dealt with is either with the usual suspects, the clone or patch type tools, or by stripping away the blue and green channels (old school) or using the Black & White Adjustment on one of the red filters. [More]

Your Phone Camera Photos Suck (Blur Removal Software Review)

No matter how good the settings on your phones camera are, they probably aren’t going to help out of focus or blurry images. You might try to take multiple shots of whatever you’re photographing, and hope at least one comes out halfway decent – that’s usually my main M.O., but if you are stuck with blurry or out of focus images, what can you do? [More]

Hard Restoration, Easy Fix in Photoshop

The first thing you may think as you look at today’s before image is “How in the world am I going to get all of that red-colored mess off?” Or it may not be, but for the sake of argument, we’ll just say it is. Here’s what you need to do to fix this. Pay attention to all the steps, here… [More]

Smoothing Texture in Photoshop

A lot of old photos have a textured appearance. Some are so bad they look like they were printed on a heavy watercolor paper, which is a very artsy effect, I'm sure, just not to everyone's taste! Texture can be corrected, especially if it isn't too terribly deep, and here's a super easy way to do it! [More]

Fixing Franken-Face

What is “Franken-face”? Consider this image: A young woman sitting on a pony on a bright and sunny day; what a great memory! The daughter of the woman pictured cherishes it, but would [More]

19th Century Beauty Experiment

What makes portrait photography so much better today than it was in the 19th century? Because, let’s face it, most of those folks didn’t look their best. Was it the lighting? Lack of make-up? The equipment? I imagine all of the above played a part, along with the fact that the subject had to sit up to 15 minutes due to the exposure time, hence no smiles. The lighting, especially at first, was quite harsh. In the beginning limelight was used, which resulted in extremely white, chalky faces, and later, battery operated arc lamps which were also quite stark. Later, around the turn of the century, full walls of windows were often used, taking advantage of daylight, as well as electric light. Even though the renaissance masters figured out how to harness and soften light to paint by (Rembrandt used shutters and a white cloth hanging over the windows to diffuse light), photographic portraiture wouldn’t reach that level until much later in the game. [More]

Resize Software – A Retrospective

First off, let me be candid. The thing that prompted this review…well, I got miffed. It started with my not being able to use my Perfect Resize 7 in CS6. I had to close CS6, open CS5, open the [More]
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