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Restoration

Tinting With the Photoshop Gradient Map Adjustment

November 9, 2015

There are many ways of tinting an image, and many of those ways I employ regularly, sometimes trying multiple methods on a Tint-Scary-Gradphotograph to get the best result because, as you regular users know and you newer to Photoshop will soon learn, every image is different and no one method will work – or work the same – 100% of the time, and different methods, of course make for different results. For the purposes of this article, however, I’m focusing on the Gradient Map adjustment layer for tinting, and using one custom gradient with the crazy hex value combination [More]

Beauty in Decay – Repairing a Photo with Photoshop

August 29, 2015

It’s a funny thing about me; if I see a damaged picture, sometimes I just really, really want to fix it. It’s almost like my fingers start tingling for the Wacom pen so I can get started. It doesn’t happen every, single time, but when it does good things usually happen. So, I decided to take a little time and fix one of them… About 6 (working) hours later, I was done with the first one I picked. It wasn’t one of the worst, but it sort of spoke to me. [More]

5 Ways: Photoshop Color Correction

July 23, 2014

I’ve been doing this Photoshop / restoration / retouching thing a long time now and I can pretty well tell just by looking what type of color correction will work on what type of fading or color cast. Curves work really well on a certain kind of orangey-red cast that’s indicative of 1970’s chain store images while nothing short of a black and white adjustment and a hand tint will work on a particular sun faded yellow cast. I do, however, try more than one method on each image just to be certain I’m getting the best result. For my 5 Ways I’m going to list the five methods that pop in my head first. They won’t always be the most popular and some might be downright odd, but there are so many ways to do any one thing in Photoshop and, frankly, the best way to do anything is the way that gives you the best result. Always using Curves, for instance, is severely limiting your potential outcome. We’ll start the 5 Ways of Color Correction with the most obvious method: [More]

Tonal Recovery in ACR

October 30, 2013

Can photo restoration be done in Adobe Camera Raw (ACR)? Of course, you know it is. After all, you’ve seen it before, right? Up to a point, that is. You’re not going to be able to remove specks, spots, cracks and tears in ACR, so to be more precise, what you can do is add clarity. That’s it in a nutshell; restoration in ACR is all about clarity. So I suppose you could say that, no, photo restoration cannot be done in ACR, but tonal recovery most certainly can! [More]

Moving Backgrounds to Fix Backgrounds in Photoshop

May 15, 2013

What you see, below, is an aberration, a crime committed against a helpless photograph. Yes, a real photograph was harmed in the making of this mess. Why it was done is beside the point; it was done many years ago and now this image remains as one of the few a daughter has of her mother. This may not be a situation that comes up for the majority of you, but in case it, or something like it comes up, there’s a fairly easy way to get the white out…out. [More]

Image Restoration With Photoshop – Getting Rid Of Red Spots

March 13, 2013

Just like us, photographs get age spots. That’s what those rusty spots are, places where the emulsion is breaking down due to age. Typically the ways they’re dealt with is either with the usual suspects, the clone or patch type tools, or by stripping away the blue and green channels (old school) or using the Black & White Adjustment on one of the red filters. [More]

Your Phone Camera Photos Suck (Blur Removal Software Review)

February 13, 2013

No matter how good the settings on your phones camera are, they probably aren’t going to help out of focus or blurry images. You might try to take multiple shots of whatever you’re photographing, and hope at least one comes out halfway decent – that’s usually my main M.O., but if you are stuck with blurry or out of focus images, what can you do? [More]

Photoshop Photo Restoration Assistance, Adam

January 16, 2013

There was a post on the G+ Photoshop and Lightroom Users group last week, from member Adam Holloway, along with this before and after photo restoration: He wrote that this was his “first real [More]

Hard Restoration, Easy Fix in Photoshop

December 19, 2012

The first thing you may think as you look at today’s before image is “How in the world am I going to get all of that red-colored mess off?” Or it may not be, but for the sake of argument, we’ll just say it is. Here’s what you need to do to fix this. Pay attention to all the steps, here… [More]

Smoothing Texture in Photoshop

October 10, 2012

A lot of old photos have a textured appearance. Some are so bad they look like they were printed on a heavy watercolor paper, which is a very artsy effect, I'm sure, just not to everyone's taste! Texture can be corrected, especially if it isn't too terribly deep, and here's a super easy way to do it! [More]

Fixing Franken-Face

September 12, 2012

What is “Franken-face”? Consider this image: A young woman sitting on a pony on a bright and sunny day; what a great memory! The daughter of the woman pictured cherishes it, but would [More]

19th Century Beauty Experiment

August 15, 2012

What makes portrait photography so much better today than it was in the 19th century? Because, let’s face it, most of those folks didn’t look their best. Was it the lighting? Lack of make-up? The equipment? I imagine all of the above played a part, along with the fact that the subject had to sit up to 15 minutes due to the exposure time, hence no smiles. The lighting, especially at first, was quite harsh. In the beginning limelight was used, which resulted in extremely white, chalky faces, and later, battery operated arc lamps which were also quite stark. Later, around the turn of the century, full walls of windows were often used, taking advantage of daylight, as well as electric light. Even though the renaissance masters figured out how to harness and soften light to paint by (Rembrandt used shutters and a white cloth hanging over the windows to diffuse light), photographic portraiture wouldn’t reach that level until much later in the game. [More]

Coloring With Photoshop – Hair

June 13, 2012

We left our heroine a bit on the pink side, but we’ll get back to that in a little while. The color of the hair can affect the way we see the skin tone, so I’d like to work on that, right now. When colorizing hair, like skin, I like to take my colors from the historical era I’m trying to duplicate [More]

Coloring With Photoshop – Skin Pt. 2

May 16, 2012

When last we saw our heroine she was looking a little, well, colorless. Today we’re going to perk things up a bit with a little help from history. First, we need to ask ourselves a couple of questions; what era is our image from and what era’s style do we want to borrow from? Of course, you can color your images any way you like, but personally, I like to borrow styles from the era the image was taken in. For the really old images that may mean striving for a watercolor or pastel look of a hand tinted image and portraits taken in the 40’s may call for the more saturated, glamorous style of that era. I’ll go more into the styles of each era and inspiration at a later date, but for now, since the image I’m working on was taken in the 40’s, you can go online and find an image or images from that era that appeals to you in terms of skin and hair color. You may feel like it’s wrong to borrow an image, but It’s okay to use these images for this purpose – all you’re going to do is sample color palettes, you’re not using the image or reproducing it in any other way. [More]

Coloring with Photoshop – Skin

April 18, 2012

Coloring black and white images is not as easy as it seems. For one thing, finding realistic skin tones is just darn hard! The same with hair colors; the reason for this is that in the real world, hair and skin colors are made up of many different colors and tones. Using just one color will make the tones one dimensional, not realistic at all. Also, there’s a tendency to try to make skin tones either too pink, resulting in a lovely lobster-esque look, or too “peachy” which usually comes out more grey, resulting in the Corpse Bride look. Not very attractive, to say the least. To get a realistic skin or hair color, therefore, we need to layer different tones, tweak, tweak again, go away, add more, take some away…well, you see, it’s not easy. [More]
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