Did you see...

Photo-montage

The Art of the Crop and Photoshop Power Tips

April 16, 2016

In this tutorial I’m not going to tell you HOW to do something, but offer you brief insight into WHY you should do it (and give you 5 power tips to inspire.) Adobe software allows you to crop [More]

How To Create A Surreal Image With Adobe Photoshop Mix

November 11, 2015

Working with the Adobe mobile apps gives you the freedom to create images wherever you are, either in their entirety or for comping ideas and refining them later. Using Adobe's Creative Sync enables you to transfer your work between your devices, both mobile and desktop, so you can start your project on the phone and add the finishing touches in Photoshop when you get home or to your studio! [More]

How To Create A Composite In Photoshop With The PixelSquid 3D Extension

November 4, 2015

The main focus of the tutorial is an amazing stock image site named PixelSquid. If you haven’t heard of it before, PixelSquid specialises in pre-rendered 3D stock image objects that can be rotated in real time, enabling you to pick the perfect angle before placing the image into your designs and photo-montages. When the site first launched, it was necessary to download the object at the required angle before adding into your composites, which still left a little guesswork as to whether it was going to fit the scene properly. A recent update has change this. [More]

Replacing a view through a window with clipping masks in Photoshop Elements

September 13, 2013

In this month's Photoshop Elements tutorial I'm going to demonstrate a neat trick for changing the view through a window. There are many ways to approach this, of course, this is a particularly versatile method, however. Instead of cutting out the glass areas of the window and putting the new view beneath, we'll use the window panes as a clipping mask. If you're unfamiliar with the concept of clipping masks, it's a way of hiding parts of a layer based on the visible areas of the layer below. In this case, only the parts of the new view will be visible where they overlap the window panes, giving the impression that we're seeing the scene behind the window frame. This is often preferable to the usual masking technique, particularly if we want to use multiple images to build the composite, where the layers would need to be beneath the target layer as we can control the visibility without the need to move the layers around in the stack. If we want to see the whole image, we simply unclip it. [More]