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Pen Tool in Photoshop – Converting Points

March 4, 2014

We continue to progress through the tricks and details of using the Pen Tool in Photoshop, and today we look at ways of converting anchor points from corners, to smooth curves, to cusp points and back. This final skill, combined with what we’ve learned in the previous videos, will give you everything you need to manage creating and editing of virtually any complex path in any image. [More]

Pen Tool in Photoshop–Straight Paths

February 3, 2014

In part 2 of my series on using the Pen Tool within Photoshop, we finally do break out the Pen Tool, and start drawing straight line paths. Learn how to place and modify corner anchor points, and how to close a path. With the closed path, we'll learn how to save the path, load the path as a selection and use it as a layer mask. [More]

Book Review – Mastering Photoshop Layers

January 31, 2014

As a reader of many Photoshop related books I’ve come to expect certain aspects to be contained within them. I want clear instructions, illustrated examples and information I haven’t found anywhere else. Mastering Photoshop layers ticks all the boxes. [More]

Pen Tool in Photoshop – Path Fundamentals

January 28, 2014

In this series of videos, we are going to work our way from the basics to pen tool mastery, but we need to start with the fundamentals. In fact, in this video, I’m not even going to use the pen tool. Instead, we’ll spend our time understanding how paths work in Photoshop, so that when we do start using the pen tool, we’ll be on familiar ground. [More]

Skin tone correction using RGB Curves in Lightroom 5

January 23, 2014

When it comes to editing skin tones, Adobe Photoshop has always reigned supreme. Lightroom could change the white balance and even alter the Hue, Saturation and Luminance values, but this is often not accurate enough to render great skin tones. This changed with the introduction of RGB curves in Lightroom 4, allowing us to change the values of Red, Green & Blue at a specific tonal range of the image. How this changes things will be explained below, but suffice to say it makes for much nicer skin tones without the need to export to photoshop. [More]

Quick Tip: Reduce Digital Noise with Photoshop

November 28, 2013

Have you ever had an image that has bits of color in it that clearly shouldn’t be there? I suppose there are all sorts of reasons they may be there (High ISO, low light…), but all some people care about is that they’re there and they want them to go away! When you see a big splotch of red on a blue shirt, it seems the simple thing to do is to do a Hue / Saturation adjustment, use the dropper to select the red and change the hue and saturation until you have a better match, but the truth is if you do that, the selection won’t be red, it’ll be the same color as the color the splotch is on, or blue. So no go on that. Besides, getting the colors to match, even somewhat, would be a pain, especially if you had a lot of photos taken at the same time, in the same conditions. So, the bad news is you can’t make them just easily go away. You can reduce them, though, and do it pretty fast, too. [More]

Getting Freaky with Photoshop Patch Tool

November 7, 2013

I will show you how to remove your eyes, nose and mouth easily from a photo just using the patch and healing tools. When creating horror pictures its often useful to remove whole parts of a face, and start again, as such I found using this method where we can remove any part of a face very easily. [More]

Replacing a view through a window with clipping masks in Photoshop Elements

September 13, 2013

In this month's Photoshop Elements tutorial I'm going to demonstrate a neat trick for changing the view through a window. There are many ways to approach this, of course, this is a particularly versatile method, however. Instead of cutting out the glass areas of the window and putting the new view beneath, we'll use the window panes as a clipping mask. If you're unfamiliar with the concept of clipping masks, it's a way of hiding parts of a layer based on the visible areas of the layer below. In this case, only the parts of the new view will be visible where they overlap the window panes, giving the impression that we're seeing the scene behind the window frame. This is often preferable to the usual masking technique, particularly if we want to use multiple images to build the composite, where the layers would need to be beneath the target layer as we can control the visibility without the need to move the layers around in the stack. If we want to see the whole image, we simply unclip it. [More]

Photoshop Image Extraction with Channels

September 3, 2013

If you're creating image composites, and especially if you're working with stock images, you'll find yourself needing to extract image elements from a white background. This can be a straightforward task with Photoshop, and often you'll get better results with some of the old school techniques. For example, take this image from Shutterstock. Here we have a figure on a white background, and your first thought might be, "I can make short work of this with Quick Selection Tool." (Or the magic wand). [More]

Wide Eyed Cat – Have Fun in Photoshop

August 8, 2013

A few years ago there were a number of birthday cards with large eyed cats and dogs on them, I thought I would spend a few minutes showing you how you can make your own spin on this idea. [More]

Quickly Spot Mistakes in Your Photoshop Masks

July 12, 2013

If you do any kind of Photoshop work using selections and cutouts, you'll know how important it is to be as accurate as possible, particularly when working with images of people. It's easy to miss areas of an object when using the Quick Selection tool, especially when working in intricate areas such as hands, bits of clothing and so on; irregularities can stick out like a sore thumb - or a missing one. They also have a habit of only showing themselves after we think we've finished the cutout, or worse still, we don't notice them at all! [More]

Book Review Digital Art by David Cousens

June 6, 2013

If you are interested in digital art then you probably have at some point come across illustrations made by David Cousens of Cool Surface. His art work has appeared in books such as The Big Book of Contemporary Illustration and The Mighty Pencil volumes 1 & 2 as well as magazines such as Advanced Photoshop, SciFiNow and Imagine FX . His impressive client list spans from Adidas to BBC, Macmillan and Creative Boom to name a few. His new book Digital Art – A complete guide to making your own computer artwork was released in May 2013. This can be purchased from Amazon [More]

Creating Torn Edges in Photoshop and Photoshop Elements

May 24, 2013

This month I'm donning my top hat and tuxedo to perform a spectacular card trick for you. First, I'll tear the card in half and then, without so much as a wave of a magic wand, I'll seamlessly mend it right in front of your very eyes! Seriously, though, if you've ever gone delving into the many filters available in Photoshop and Photoshop Elements, you will no doubt have come across the Torn Edges filter. As the name suggests, it will give you a super torn edge effect on your image. Well, no, actually it won't, not if it's applied directly to the image, that is; all you'll end up creating is a fuzzy monochrome graphic element. [More]
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